Marsha P Johnson Print

Marsha P Johnson Print

£20.00Price

A4 print celebrating the life and work of Marsha P Johnson. High quality prints on 170gsm matte photo paper, packaged in a biodegradable plastic sleeve and recycled grey board to keep it safe and clean till it reaches you!

 

'History isn't something you look back at and say ti was inevitable, it happens because people make decisions that are sometimes very impulsive and of the moment, but those moments are cumulative realities' - Marsha

 

10% of funds will be donated to an LGBT Health and Wellbeing who play a key role in improving the health and wellbeing of LGBT+ people in Scotland and helping to promote the equality of our community across the country.

 

 

Marsha ‘Pay it no mind’ Johnson was an absolute legend 👑

 

Marsha P. Johnson, a transwoman, became an important face to the LGBTQ community in New York City in the 1960s. She was recognized for being herself and fearing no judgment of the harassment and ridicule faced in even in the most liberal parts of the city.

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The rejection of this culture turned violent in 1969 during the Stonewall Riots in Greenwich Village of New York which was known for its LGBTQ subculture. Police raided a known gay bar The Stonewall Inn, which Marsha P. Johnson had been at, and a violent riot followed. Robert Heide remembers the role Marsha played the night of the riots, “I just saw her in the middle of the whole thing, screaming and yelling and throwing rocks…This was started by the street queens of that era, which I was part of, Marsha P. Johnson, and many others that are not here.”

 

Among many other achievements to better the lives of her community, Marsha and close friend, Sylvia Rivera, started a house for transgender people or anyone who needed help getting off the streets where violent attacks would be commonplace simply for being who they were. Marsha became known as the Queen Mother of the house they named STAR⭐️ a non patriarchal, found family, where anyone who joined would be known as ‘Children’ and welcomed to the house free of judgement and ridicule.

 

Marsha died in 1992, her body was found in the Hudson River, police put it to suicide but those who knew her firmly insisted she was murdered, she had been see earlier in the day in a dispute, the police made no investigation into her death despite the outcry of the community.

 

Marsha is a representation of fearlessness and hope, a shining light in a time where it was even harder to be trans, she and those of the same era deserve to be remembered for all the battles they fought that paved the way for a battle still ongoing for lgbtq people today.